Fleshweaving

Fleshweaving is the art of manipulating the form of a living being. Primarily but not entirely magical, fleshweaving is used to mend wounds, remove wrinkles, change facial features, replace organs, or completely transform a living being into something else or something new. In most cultures where fleshweaving is in practice, it is used for medical or cosmetic purposes, especially by the elite. Many a rich noble has lived a full two hundred years looking no older than twenty thanks to a dutiful in-house fleshweaver, and a grievously wounded royal guard might be made whole and scarless by a grateful monarch. Others, however, use the art to change their appearance, changing their hair and skin color, their height and shape, and even giving themselves new features or organs, such as eyes that can see in the dark or covering their skin in bony armor. Some of the most extreme fleshweaving has been used to make entirely new creatures out of old ones, such as the sphinx and manticore guardians of The Library – whether derived from human or animal stock, nobody is certain – and those changed are not always volunteers. Because the art is so often associated with vain elites or the makers of monsters, fleshweaving is banned from many communities, and distrusted in many of the rest. Those who indulge in or practice this art must always be wary of the pitch forks and torches of the fearful or spiteful.

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Fleshweaving

Jalan: Mysteries of the Haunted World Incenjucar